News Archive

Irssi 1.1.0 Released

Posted on January 15th 2018

Happy new year again from the Irssi Team!

Irssi 1.1.0 has been released. This release is the result of all the contributions Irssi received in the past year. Of course, it includes all the security fixes from Irssi 1.0.6.

Will Storey, Joseph Bisch, Edward Tomasz Napierala and Jari Matitainen contributed to this release and accepted our invitation to join the project, as well as external contributions from Robert Bisewski, Paul Townsend, Oscar Linderholm, Rodrigo Rebello, Stephen Oberholtzer, Paolo Martini, Martijn Dekker, Tim Konick, Hanno Böck, Tristan Pepin Michael Hansen, and Lasse Toimela. In total 151 files changed, with 6214 line insertions and 1062 line deletions. Thanks everyone!

We rushed in some last minute fixes into 1.1.0 so as they wouldn’t have to sit on the queue until next year. We hope it doesn’t affect stability of the release too much. Thanks for those helping us test by running the Git version!

Some notable changes:

  • /server does not connect to servers anymore, we recommend using /connect! You can also change servers using /server connect
  • /foreach now emits commands instead of sending text to the targets

Some interesting new features:

  • If you use the per window command history, global history can now be accessed with Ctrl+Arrows
  • History entries can now be deleted (e.g. to remove some secrets)
  • East-asian users will enjoy /set break_wide to make words wrap more naturally
  • On FreeBSD, Irssi now supports the Capsicum sandbox (experimental)
  • Lines with certain levels can be hidden from screen (not ignored), using /window hidelevel

Some new developments:

  • Fuzzing code has been added to the repository, which may help find certain kinds of bugs (and already has!)
  • Module authors can now use net_start_ssl for StartTLS (used e.g. by Quassel)
  • Irssi now has a folder for unit tests!

See the NEWS for details.

After installing the new release, you can use /upgrade to re-launch your Irssi binary, but don’t forget to /save first. TLS connections will break and require manual /reconnect 1 and so on. To save and restore the window content, load the buf.pl script and make sure it is in autorun. Starting with Irssi 1.1.0, you can also save and restore your command history – check this comment until someone comes up with a proper script.

We are committed to put security, stability and regression fixes on subsequent 1.1.x releases, as we have done for 1.0.

As usual, there remains a lot to be done. We are always looking for help, so you can check the bugs and see if you can fix some, or implement some of the enhancement requests. The initial version of horizontal splits has already landed in Git and thus should be included in Irssi 1.2.0.

This release can be downloaded from our releases page. Binary test packages for various Linux distributions are automatically generated by the openSUSE Build Service and are available for download in the irssi-test repository.

By the way, test packages for the Git version are also available for download in the irssi-git repository, and an archive of the old stable version is available in irssi-oldtest.

We are also looking for packagers who want to take the challenge of adding compatible builds of irssi-{python,otr,xmpp,icb,quassel,fish,theme-indent,…} to either distributions or the openSUSE Build Service (has to support all our current targets there.)

Feel welcome to join our IRC channel, or discuss this news, on reddit.

The Irssi Team.

Irssi 1.0.6 Released

Posted on January 7th 2018

Happy new year from the Irssi Team!

Irssi 1.0.6 has been released. This release fixes a few security issues in Irssi as well as a few bugs. There are no new features. All Irssi users should upgrade to this version. See the NEWS for details.

Most issues have been identified using fuzzing, thanks to Joseph Bisch.

For more information refer to the security advisory.

This release can be downloaded from our releases page. Binary test packages for various Linux distributions are automatically generated by the openSUSE Build Service and are available for download in the irssi-test repository.

Please check with your distro whether they provide officially updated packages.

We currently do not have any alternate advice.

The Irssi Team.

Irssi 1.0.5 Released

Posted on October 22nd 2017

Irssi 1.0.5 has been released. This release fixes a few security issues in Irssi as well as a few bugs. There are no new features. All Irssi users should upgrade to this version. See the NEWS for details.

Most issues have been identified using fuzzing, thanks to Hanno Böck and Joseph Bisch. We expect Joseph will be able to tell you more about his newest fuzzer at freenode.live on the weekend!

For more information refer to the security advisory.

This release can be downloaded from our releases page. Binary test packages for various Linux distributions are automatically generated by the openSUSE Build Service and are available for download in the irssi-test repository.

Please check with your distro whether they provide officially updated packages.

We currently do not have any alternate advice.

The Irssi Team.

Irssi 1.0.4 Released

Posted on July 7th 2017

Irssi 1.0.4 has been released. This release fixes two remote crash issues in Irssi as well as a few bugs, correcting a mistake that was introduced in 1.0.3 while parsing some time-related settings. There are no new features. All Irssi users should upgrade to this version. See the NEWS for details.

Our bug reporter Brian ‘geeknik’ Carpenter writes:

34 days after reading Fuzzing Irssi, my AFL instance was finally able to trigger a null pointer dereference in irssi 1.0.2. […] Hopefully this one isn’t fixed yet.

35 days after reading Fuzzing Irssi, my AFL instance triggered a heap-use-after-free in irssi 1.0.2. Compiled on Debian 8 x64 following the instructions and patches of the referenced article. (;

For more information refer to the security advisory.

Thanks, Brian!

This release can be downloaded from our releases page. Binary test packages for various Linux distributions are automatically generated by the openSUSE Build Service and are available for download in the irssi-test repository.

Please check with your distro whether they provide officially updated packages.

We currently do not have any alternate advice.

The Irssi Team.

Irssi 1.0.3 Released

Posted on June 6th 2017

Irssi 1.0.3 has been released. This release fixes two remote crash issue in Irssi as well as a few bug fixes, the most notable that TLS can now be disabled from within the text-UI. There are no new features. All Irssi users should upgrade to this version. See the NEWS for details.

Read the security advisory.

Read more... the Irssi Team.

Fuzzing Irssi

Posted by Joseph Bischon May 12th 2017

Hello fellow Irssi users and people interested in learning about fuzzing,

There have been recent efforts within the Irssi and open source security communities to make Irssi more secure through the use of fuzzing. For example the security bugs revealed in the first Irssi security advisory of 2017 were found by fuzzing. In this blog post, we will cover an introduction to fuzzing, how to fuzz Irssi, and a look at a couple of actual bugs found in past versions of Irssi.

Read more... the Irssi Team.

Help us test horizontal/vertical splits

Posted by Nei on May 6th 2017

It all started in 2005, when I asked in FS#310 whether vertical splits would be possible. By that, of course, I meant to split the windows horizontally in a line. At that time, the most popular version of Irssi had been 0.8.9 for several years.

Read more... the Irssi Team.

Poll: Non-UTF-8 discontinuation

Posted on March 12th 2017

Hello fellow Irssi users,

We are planning to remove 8-bit and Chinese support from Irssi.

Interaction with legacy IRC channels would still be provided through /recode, as it is currently.

However, Irssi would stop working on non-UTF-8 terminals (or at least appear heavily glitched)

If you have any helpful comments or concerns about this topic, please raise your voice either in the GitHub issue 671 or by writing an e-mail. We’re especially interested to learn about people who are still using the 8-bit support and why you would not be able to move to Unicode.

Thank you for your support,

The Irssi Team.